25 April 2009

Why you should share your nature observations and photos

The hugely successful Bird Ecology Study Group blog explains why it is important to share sightings. These help increase understanding and awareness. This argument applies to all sightings, in addition to bird behaviour sightings.

What happens if you do not post your observations and images? The Bird Ecology Study Group blog explains the consequences too.

You are not doing justice to your observations and images. And you are not sharing… In which case your observations will only be known to you and a few close friends. In due course they will be irrelevant and end up in the dustbin of science. This is a waste as every observation has its worth. And when someone else reports the same behaviour later on, credit will go to him or her. You can always claim that you saw this or that first but who will believe you?
For our shores, it is equally important to Explore, Express and Act.

Explore: visit & learn
Here's factsheets for visitors and latest happenings on our wild shores and other wild places. Keep up-to-date with the latest on marine issues in general and issues relating to Singapore shores.

Express: Share & speak up
Blog about your sightings. Bring along others. Share your photos/videos online, e.g., on flickr or YouTube. If you need IDs, I'd be glad to try to help. I will also be glad to post your wild shore sightings on the wild fact sheets. Check out this example of sightings and photos shared by others about our shores. Here's the latest blog posts about our shores.

Act: volunteer & make a difference
Check out the long list of current volunteer opportunities, and updates on some ad hoc volunteer opportunities and jobs in biodiversity and environment related fields.

2 comments:

  1. The Singaporeans have started something so big and so well-documented here. I wish Malaysians also have such selfless sharing culture. Otherwise we would never know what we have and what we've lost.

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  2. Prof Wee has created an outstanding resource with his Bird Ecology Study Group blog. I must wholeheartedly agree with you Tadpole. And your sentiments about knowing what we have, and thus hopefully not losing them.

    I'm sure there are Malaysian blogs on nature that provide similar service? If anyone comes across any, I would be glad to add them to my reading list and feature them on wildsingapore news. Do let me know.

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